Children of a Dead Earth

Children of a Dead Earth

89% Positive / 484 Ratings

RELEASE DATE

Sep 23, 2016

DEVELOPER / PUBLISHER

Q Switched Productions, LLC / Q Switched Productions, LLC

TAGS

    SimulationStrategy
The Most Scientifically Accurate Space Warfare Simulator Ever Made.

Children of a Dead Earth is a simulation of true-to-life space warfare. Design your spacecrafts using real world technologies. Traverse the solar system using actual orbit mechanics. Command fleets as the solar system descends into war, and see if you have what it takes to become the victor.

Features

REAL SCIENCE, REAL TECHNOLOGY - Every technology, from the Nuclear Thermal Rockets, to the Railguns, to the Magnetoplasmadynamic Thrusters, was implemented using actual equations from Engineering and Physics textbooks and white papers. Every aspect of these systems, efficiency, size, mass, power usage, heat dissipation, are all derived from valid equations.

CAMPAIGN AND SANDBOX MODES - Assume the role of an admiral and fight through a detailed storyline chronicling the descent of the solar system into all out war, spanning every planet in the solar system and everything in between. Or simply play in the sandbox, designing ships and pitting them against other ships.

EXTREMELY ACCURATE ORBITAL MECHANICS - With an N-Body Simulator (the kind NASA uses to plot spacecraft trajectories), all orbital phenomenon from hyperbolic orbits, Lagrange points, and orbital perturbation are all correctly simulated. Spacecrafts can stationkeep orbits, or enter into free falling perturbed orbits.

1:1 SCALE - The solar system is modeled completely to scale. The sizes of all planets, moons, and asteroids are accurately enormous, and the distance between them is similarly huge. The extremely high orbital speed of your ships deep in high gravity orbits is correspondingly correct.

FREEFORM SHIP DESIGN - Build your spacecrafts out of rockets, propellant tanks, weapons, powerplants, radiators, and crew modules. Wrap it all up with multiple armor layers, and maybe a Whipple Shield to boot. The acceleration, moment of inertia, delta-v, and much more are all correctly calculated for all spacecrafts you design.

HIGHLY GRANULAR MODULE DESIGN - Tweak everything from the nozzle length or stoichiometric mixture ratio of your bipropellant rockets to the armature and rail dimensions of your railguns. The results of every change is seen in real time, from the change in your rocket's exhaust velocity, to your railgun's inductance or muzzle velocity.

PHYSICALLY ACCURATE MATERIAL PROPERTIES - All materials, chemical reactions, and spectra are physically correct. When your arclamp pumps your solid state laser, the pumping bands need to match up with the actual emission spectra of your excitation gas. When the photon absorption of a material is needed, it is derived from actual refractive index spectra data.

IN-ENGINE MOD SUPPORT - The engine supports black box creation of untested or far future technology for modders to work with. All other game data, from levels to material properties, is also accessible to modders.

STEAM WORKSHOP SUPPORT - Subscribe to mods on Steam Workshop, and they will automatically load. In-game export tools allow instant uploading of your own designs to Steam Workshop.

All of the above aspects combine to yield a space warfare simulator that is unparalleled in scientific realism. No other game combines the extremely accurate orbital mechanics, 1:1 scale of the solar system, and technology which is implemented 100% by scientific equations. If you ever wanted to know what space warfare would

actually

be like, this is the game for you.

Children of a Dead Earth pc price

Children of a Dead Earth

Children of a Dead Earth pc price

89% Positive / 484 Ratings

Sep 23, 2016 / Q Switched Productions, LLC / Q Switched Productions, LLC

    SimulationStrategy
Price Comparison
  • United States
    $19.99 $19.99
  • Argentina
    ARS$224.99 ≈$1.08
  • Turkey
    ₺31.99 ≈$1.67
$19.99 / Get it

Game Description

The Most Scientifically Accurate Space Warfare Simulator Ever Made.

Children of a Dead Earth is a simulation of true-to-life space warfare. Design your spacecrafts using real world technologies. Traverse the solar system using actual orbit mechanics. Command fleets as the solar system descends into war, and see if you have what it takes to become the victor.

Features

REAL SCIENCE, REAL TECHNOLOGY - Every technology, from the Nuclear Thermal Rockets, to the Railguns, to the Magnetoplasmadynamic Thrusters, was implemented using actual equations from Engineering and Physics textbooks and white papers. Every aspect of these systems, efficiency, size, mass, power usage, heat dissipation, are all derived from valid equations.

CAMPAIGN AND SANDBOX MODES - Assume the role of an admiral and fight through a detailed storyline chronicling the descent of the solar system into all out war, spanning every planet in the solar system and everything in between. Or simply play in the sandbox, designing ships and pitting them against other ships.

EXTREMELY ACCURATE ORBITAL MECHANICS - With an N-Body Simulator (the kind NASA uses to plot spacecraft trajectories), all orbital phenomenon from hyperbolic orbits, Lagrange points, and orbital perturbation are all correctly simulated. Spacecrafts can stationkeep orbits, or enter into free falling perturbed orbits.

1:1 SCALE - The solar system is modeled completely to scale. The sizes of all planets, moons, and asteroids are accurately enormous, and the distance between them is similarly huge. The extremely high orbital speed of your ships deep in high gravity orbits is correspondingly correct.

FREEFORM SHIP DESIGN - Build your spacecrafts out of rockets, propellant tanks, weapons, powerplants, radiators, and crew modules. Wrap it all up with multiple armor layers, and maybe a Whipple Shield to boot. The acceleration, moment of inertia, delta-v, and much more are all correctly calculated for all spacecrafts you design.

HIGHLY GRANULAR MODULE DESIGN - Tweak everything from the nozzle length or stoichiometric mixture ratio of your bipropellant rockets to the armature and rail dimensions of your railguns. The results of every change is seen in real time, from the change in your rocket's exhaust velocity, to your railgun's inductance or muzzle velocity.

PHYSICALLY ACCURATE MATERIAL PROPERTIES - All materials, chemical reactions, and spectra are physically correct. When your arclamp pumps your solid state laser, the pumping bands need to match up with the actual emission spectra of your excitation gas. When the photon absorption of a material is needed, it is derived from actual refractive index spectra data.

IN-ENGINE MOD SUPPORT - The engine supports black box creation of untested or far future technology for modders to work with. All other game data, from levels to material properties, is also accessible to modders.

STEAM WORKSHOP SUPPORT - Subscribe to mods on Steam Workshop, and they will automatically load. In-game export tools allow instant uploading of your own designs to Steam Workshop.

All of the above aspects combine to yield a space warfare simulator that is unparalleled in scientific realism. No other game combines the extremely accurate orbital mechanics, 1:1 scale of the solar system, and technology which is implemented 100% by scientific equations. If you ever wanted to know what space warfare would

actually

be like, this is the game for you.

Reviews

  • CaptainKoloth

    Dec 24, 2021

    Amazing idea. Not well executed. I am an astrophysicist, aerospace engineer, and a gamer. I want to love this game. I tried hard to love this game. I am squarely the target audience for this game, and I am willing to give it a tremendous amount of leeway. However, while there may be a tremendous amount of extremely accurate stuff going on under the hood, that's precisely the problem- it's under the hood. As the player, you can't see any of it. Sid Meier, the famous video game developer of Civilization, PIrates, Railroad Tycoon, et al. fame, has a number of axioms for good video game design. One of these is that you need to be cautious that the player is the one having the fun rather than the designer. This is a perfect example of a game that fails that rule. If you read the store description, you'll see that, for example, the game has an extremely accurate orbit propagator. I am certain this is true. But where do I see that in the game? There is no visibility into how orbits are being calculated, what forces are being taken into effect, or into what the orbital trajectories would look like with a less accurate propagator. The orbits might as well be completely abstracted and not physically calculated at all. I'm not sure a typical player would be able to tell. The designer had a lot of fun coding a highly accurate propagator, but the results are invisible and ultimately irrelevant to the player. Even more important is what this does to the combat phase. On the game's website it will talk about how each projectile is being physically simulated with real equations, the force generated by magnetic coils, the torque it imparts to the firing spacecraft, etc. Again, I'm sure this is true. I'm very excited by this as a theory. But there is no layer connecting the physics to the gameplay. As a player, all you see is a confusing mass of colors, some slowdown, and then some messages about what got damaged. You have no idea what weapons damaged what, how, where, when, or why. You have very little capability to do anything to really affect the combat, and again, while I'm sure all the physics of the engagement are highly accurate, they are totally invisible to the player. The designer clearly had an enormous amount of fun coding an extraordinarily accurate physical simulation of space warfare. I'm sure it IS accurate. But he forgot to include an intermediate layer actually connecting the player to any of the calculations occurring or allowing him to meaningfully affect it, or even see it. The sad thing, this would be very easy to fix since all the hard work of calculating the physics is already done. One could envision some kind of log showing what weapons were fired, what calculations were made regarding, e.g. their velocity based on the power input to the weapons involved, what happened when the projectiles hit the other ship, etc. Many combat sims that strive for realism have such logs (e.g. in a tank game showing what projectiles hit where and what they did). However, since the game has unfortunately long since been abandoned, this will never happen. I wish this weren't the case. I so want to love this game... but it's a good set of equations running somewhere, not a good game. And I'd even be OK with that at some level, but I don't even know what the equations are. The fact that somewhere an accurate physics simulation is happening that I am completely unable to see is not of a lot of value to me as a player or a consumer.
  • dennisvlahos

    Feb 16, 2022

    This has been an amazing journey and I highly recommend!

    If you ever wanted to roleplay as James Holden from The Expanse, doing gravity slingshots across the solar system and making high velocity intercepts, this is definitely the game for you. It is a bit complex but the campaign (that acts as a tutorial) does a good job of gradually explaining everything and the interface is structured and concise. The game comes with a small library of articles and links to Wikipedia that will take you from being scientifically illiterate to designing nuclear reactors in no time, so don't let the complexity intimidate you. You will be learning so much about orbits, materials and chemical reactions from this, it's not even funny. Story mode is cheesy but fun and you can make your own campaigns and levels. However you will be spending most of your time designing custom ships & modules and pitting them against each other in the sandbox mode. The AI in general is a bit stupid but you can easily mod in custom behavior templates to fit your designs. Speaking of mods, there is workshop integration so you can share designs with other people and download custom stuff like material/AI mods. Much of the game is moddable, and allows you to create out of the box cheat "black box" modules intended to allow you to simulate far future or fictional technology (like The Expanse's reactionless drive). As far as simulation goes, this is currently the most precise depiction of what interplanetary warfare

    might

    look like. The most important aspect (orbital mechanics) is very accurately simulated - you will be blown away by how counter intuitively (but at the same time intuitively) orbits work - and

    most

    of the assumptions made about everything else are sound. When you are designing e.g. a combustion rocket in the module designer, you can be reasonably certain that what you're creating can be made in the real world, and that it would perform very similarly. Less so when you're making stuff like nukes (much of the information is confidential) or railguns (your rails don't need replacement after thousands of multi-megawatt shots, an unsolved material-science problem today), the more experimental a technology the lower being the realism of course. Now this being a hard sci-fi game you might expect to be disappointed by the limitations that reality and the rocket equation impose on your designs, but this actually makes it even more fun - if not more challenging, and you will be constantly surprised by just how much "sci fi" is really possible. Physical limitations create some very exciting problems that you have to weave around, which are curiously absent from most sci-fi (e.g. managing your tight propellant budget). There are so many design decisions to be made about your modules and where to place them, your choice of fuel and propellant, what kind of damage to armor against and in which way (armor composition is very in depth and you can make whipple shields, spall liners, composite or monolithic plates), if it would be better to forgo armor and rely on more propellant for evading intercepts, whether to specialize or to have a multipurpose ship, whether to go big and redundant or small and agile, whether to have fewer expensive ships versus more cheap ships and so much more. There are just as many decisions to be made when you're charting a course to intercept an enemy fleet, or trying to out-maneuver a ship or an incoming drone/missile salvo intercept. Since there is no stealth in space, you can see the composition and fitting of your enemy from ten orbits away and plan accordingly. The angle and speed at which you intercept a target literally dictate how combat evolves. If you intercept retrograde or perpendicular to your target the resulting combat will be over in seconds because of the speeds involved, but all bullets and kinetic kill missiles will have that much more power, making armor weaker. You may intercept prograde and purposely at very low speeds to pummel the enemy fleet with your long range lasers and coilguns, keeping out of range of their short range cannons. When combat begins, you again need to make so many decisions ! Where to move to evade heavy fire, how to roll to expose less damaged parts of the armor to incoming fire (perhaps ensuring that your armor is properly angled for maximum ricocheting), which weapon systems to offline when one of your reactors get hit and now suddenly you are at half power output, etc. However, if you want your designs to be super realistic you need to consider certain things outside of the game, because the game will let you do things that make no sense in reality. For example, the radiation that a nuclear reactor emits is calculated and your crew needs to be shielded against it, but you can armor your ship with depleted uranium and cover your crew compartment with hangars for nuclear reactor powered drones and the game will never complain. Likewise fuel lines, ammunition conveyors, sensors, heatpipes and other stuff are all abstracted away. All of the ships' modules however are simulated correctly in real time - they draw power, output heat to radiators, reload etc. If you lose some of your reactor's radiators, the reactor is forced to wind down and suddenly you don't have enough power to feed all of your lasers at once. Material cost is calculated by the solar abundance of the elements that make up your modules but manufacturing complexity is not considered. Coming up with a realistic design that works is really satisfying ! The music is good. The sound design is great - there is no sound in space, but you will be enjoying the terrifying and visceral noises of your armor being pummeled by hypervelocity slugs and your crew compartment violently depressurizing. The graphics are very simple and rather bland. Very much programmer art, although it doesn't detract from the experience. You can spice things up by using 3rd party effect injectors like ReShade. The performance is bad. The game is not optimized much and you will be having problems - the n-body simulator is CPU bound - even with a good computer. If you have too many missiles, drones and guns in the same combat the simulation will slow to a crawl. If you are charting e.g a complex multiple-burn maneuver targeting multiple fleets your display will crawl and you

    will

    unavoidably get frustrated trying to input precise movements through a slideshow. Cluttered battlespaces with multiple fleets, missiles and drones in orbit will make it difficult, frustrating and hard to the eyes to plot courses. There are a few bugs, through not too many to seriously impact your play. You won't experience crashes under normal circumstances, but things get dicey if you try to introduce extreme amounts of complex designs. If you have a reasonably powerful computer, an interest in hard sci-fi and some patience, this is truly a one-of-a-kind experience. Yes, it is a niche unoptimized indie game by basically a lone developer, that will frustrate you and drive you up a wall plenty of times, but I am so glad that it exists. Buy it and try it out within the 2 hour refund window. The ship and module designer start out locked but you can unlock them through the "Infolinks" menu. You will probably be able to tell if this game is for you immediately - you'll either be indifferent to it or you'll love-hate the crap out of it.

  • Shinelite

    Sep 20, 2022

    This is an abysmal game and a terrible testing environment. There is no save feature mid-mission. You can't save and quit and come back later. And if you crash you lose all progress. That happened to me multiple times. That's unacceptable, so this'll always be a negative review so long as that is missing. Second, the dev has abandoned the project. Third, you might want to forget about missions and just test weapons and armor. Well, the game is not set up to let you do that. Things happen at an extremely fast rate, and you cannot slow down time to watch how exactly they happen. You have terrible camera controls, so it's hard to view things from the angle you want. There is significant frame slowdown when you turn on the armor viewer to see what armor is getting hit where. There's no log of events to review what transpired and see how effective any given component was. There are also hidden engine limitations that people mistake for physics. For example, the rate of fire of guns is limited to a specific value - no faster than 1 shot per 33 m/s. But the game doesn't tell you about that. So a gun that fires 1 shot per 34ms is identical to one that fire one shot per 65ms. There's no warning indicator or heads up that this is happening. Another example, for months people believed you could create Nuclear Explosively Formed Penetrators, just like a HEAT round but using a nuke for the explosive. But actually this was due to a camera bug. Yes, a CAMERA bug! You can accidentally teleport your nukes inside of the enemy ship by clicking on them after you fire. The game also fails to account for propulsion that isn't located at the back of the ship. It doesn't know how to maneuver a craft that has only sideways thrusters, e.g. a gun-fired projectile with limited guidance. Oh, and the way this game does missile guidance is the worst setup you could possibly imagine. The worst. No, it's even worse than you're thinking. It's atrocious. Don't bother giving up $20 for an abandoned project with zero quality of life features.
  • Wardog362

    Sep 25, 2022

    Q switched productions can you please release Children of a dead earth as open source software. Many people love this game and want to mod it to the full extent possible. dont let this unique game die please.
  • Faffy

    Oct 7, 2022

    Got to the mission "Retaking Ceres" It's a giant middle finger to the player and not one i've beaten without knowledge of game bugs and exploiting the AI.
  • Doctor Game

    Feb 25, 2023

    It's Kerbal Space Program, if the Kerbals fled a dying Kerbin and had interfactional space-war and realistically modelled space-death.
  • The Inventor

    Sep 24, 2016

    EDIT 2: (July 7, 2018) HEY, THIS GAME HAS A LEVEL EDITOR NOW!! YEAH!!! EDIT: It's been a while, so find my longer-term review down below this! -=ORIGINAL REVIEW=- So after logging about an hour of the game, this is what I gotta say so far... PROS: - Holy shit; it's about time that the gaming market has gotten a game like this. Hard sci-fi fans have been denied a game that they can seriously dig their number-crunching teeth into for YEARS. - Controlling your ships is very easy and convenient. - Combat is really fun to watch, and really does highlight all the reasons why practical and realistic space combat is really cool. - I love the worldbuilding and story that is in this game. I really appreciate that the game also comes with an area where I can simply read over who the different factions are, and what the system's history entails. - SANDBOX MODE, YEAAAAHHHH!!! SUCK IT, MWO! THIS GAME ACTUALLY HAS A SANDBOX MODE. - The soundtrack~ Aw yis, this is a very good soundtrack. Not too in-your-face to be distracting, but also active enough to not be boring. The various synths are constructed really well, and are generally very satisfying to listen to. The drums are a very interesting choice, given the theme of the game, but any alternative I would have picked would have been way too aggressive or electronic, and thus distract the player. - The sound design is really excellent as well. Similar to the soundtrack, it sits between two extremes very nicely, giving that extra bit of feedback without being annoying. (Here, I'm looking at a few games in particular where the sound of your mouse going over a menu button is some super-obnoxious beep that never seems to stop haunting you. This game doesn't have that; it won't haunt you in your sleep.) - SpeakING OF SOUND DESIGN: NO SOUND IS SPACE, CAN I GET A HELL YES?? - Can I also mention that the actual GAMEPLAY is really unique as well? It kinda works as an real-time and turn-based hybrid, giving you time to think when you need it, but still remaining within a constantly-moving universe. - Orbital mechanics: yes. Just yes. No botchy estimations. We actually get full physical simulations of orbits, with all the fun traits it brings. We even get to choose our frame of reference, which is really nice. - I have yet to find a bug in the game. - Tutorial is included and very clear, thank the galaxy. CONS: - I'm really used to the mouse rotating in another direction when I drag it a certain way. It would be really nice to have an option where we can invert certain dragging directions. - I feel like this is a game that a lot of Hollywood fans are gonna attack because they don't understand what it's actually trying to accomplish here. I'm trying to spread news of this game as far and wide as I can to all the hard sci-fi nerds I know, because this game deserves to have an awesome fanbase. I may post another review as I get more hours into this, because I invariably will. -=UPDATE REVIEW=- Hi! Me again! Now that I've logged a few more hours into this, and have been around long enough to see a few released updates, I will add the following: I had the following con of "I'm really used to the mouse rotating in another direction when I drag it a certain way. It would be really nice to have an option where we can invert certain dragging directions." Well, the developer did see this really early, and added an option for this! Now I have no real personal cons against this game! Also: UPDATES! Yes, this game is still being actively updated to squash bugs, improve gameplay, and make optimizations! I've also gotten to the ship customization point of the campaign, as well as module customization, and WOAH. Boys, Girls, and Non-Binaries, if you enjoy tinkering the ever-loving shit out of your creations, DOWN TO THE LENSE OF A LASER, then this is definitely the game for you! Still amazing! Would still recommend! 11/10!
  • AlienPickle

    Sep 24, 2016

    This game is everything I've been wanting in "realistic" space combat. Imagine Kerbal but with non-fantasy weapons, and a pretty decent campaign of scenarios. This game is NOT easy. You'll have to get your head around real-world physics, because there is no flying by the seat of your pants. Everything is a plotted intercept course, and the extremely limited amount of fuel the ships can carry means it's as much a puzzle game as anything. It's all about timing and altering your orbit to put your ship in position to fire at the enemy. Intersecting ellipses and last moment course correction burns. Some ships are carriers for drones, so you use the carrier to line up the intercept and then let the drones burn their own fuel while you stay out of gun range yourself. This is all very plausible. The closest I've ever seen this elsewhere is Ken Burnside's "Attack Vector Tactical" board game. This is NOT Star Trek. I sincerely hope the developers continue to expand on this game, keep making scenarios, and maybe figuring out how to get some multiplayer into the next iteration. I'm going to be busy a long while with this.
  • r4m0n

    Sep 25, 2016

    THIS GAME ISN'T FOR EVERYBODY, and it really could have used a few weeks on Early Access to round off the edges. First and foremost: I'm mostly liking the game so far, and I'll probably change this to a recommendation in the future, but as of the writing of this, the game has only 15 positive reviews and no negative ones, so I'll put an warning here before people think this is something it's not and we get a flood of bad reviews. Some general points: Graphics - Rendering realistic space battles isn't an excuse to not at least try to make it pretty. Sorry, but this game really needs a bit love from a 3D artist. I see your normal maps stored in JPG, and if any 3D artist see this they'll try to hang you. This game screams programmer graphics everywhere, and while I'm a programmer myself, this isn't excusable on a $25 title. Interface - Generally quite well done and useable, but could use some more work on the finer points of orbital maneuvers, like being able to move the execution point of the maneuver to change the timing, and splitting fleets of drones/missiles after launch. Sound - Pretty good sound effects and music in general, bit repetitive theme on the menu, but it works overall. Setting - The story and science of the game is the reason you should be getting it, it's pretty well done and a lot of research went into making this game, and it shows. So far I've played up to the 5th campaign mission, and enjoyed the first 4 quite a bit... On the 5th though, you are introduced to missiles, and they just aren't ready for release yet. The main problem is that the terminal guidance (and really, the guidance in general) can't get the job done and even if the target has had its rocket disabled, the missiles can't get a solid hit on the target ship, and much less anywhere near any priority target you set, which makes you being able to finish the mission totally random. Overall, if you like Rocketry, has a general sense of how orbital mechanics works and like realistic simulations, this game is for you, but you might want to wait a bit and see if the rough edges are polished down first. If you can't get a rocket built and on orbit in KSP, you're probably better off passing this one.
  • Ces

    Sep 27, 2016

    >Unlock ability to design custom modules. >Open up nuclear reactor, realize I actually have to understand how to buld a nuclear reactor. >Huh. >Poke around in railguns and coil guns instead. >Decide coilgun is just a poor man's railgun. >Click sliders until I notice I'm getting 60 km/s on my coilgun. >Whut. >Adjust more, begin smiling as speed climbs past 170 km/s. >Adjust more, swap materials, discover I can squeeze 16 Mm/s out of my coilguns. (Using aluminum coils of all things.) >Stick coilgun of doom on tiny ship, name it the cheesepuff. >Proceed to destroy ships 5 times my cost and mass from a completely different orbit. 10/10 would learn physics/materials science again.
  • Cane McKeyton

    Sep 27, 2016

    For lovers of hard science fiction this is pretty much the dream game. Heat radiators, nuclear thermal rockets, lasers, real n-body physics, and orbital mechanics, it’s all here. Star Wars style space battles, you won’t find that here. This is all about matching orbits, flinging missiles at targets hundreds of kilometers away and drilling away at your target’s armor with concentrated laser and rail gun fire. The campaign is challenging enough but the ship and component editor is a whole ‘nother story. Making your own ship components is, to put it lightly, INSANE! The amount of parameters you can modify is mind boggling. Just trying to make a custom laser weapon I have to chose a lasing medium, what material to make the mirrors out of, what are those mirror’s dimensions, what will the freaking coolant pumps be made out of and what fluid will they be pumping and how fast! I feel like I need several advanced engineering degrees to wrap my head around all this, which is cool, but overwhelming! I like that it gives you these insane custom tinkering options but unless you know what you’re doing it’s best to just stick with the stock parts to build your ships. I really can’t think of any other game out there that takes hard science fiction this seriously. Probably Kerbal Space Program is the closest thing to this but that’s really not a helpful comparison.
  • rlg007

    Sep 29, 2016

    I like the fact that someone is trying to make a game that is science based and not just eye candy. I wouldnt call the game "early access", it is 100% playable and I found zero bugs in the few hours I have played, BUT the game is still a little rough around the edges. Here are a few thoughts (based on only a few hours play and only on the first few missions) : - Nothing like KSP. You can build your own ships and adjust orbits, but that is where the similarities end. I do not want anyone to read this review thinking that this is KSP with nukes and lasers. [EDIT: This is more like the old game Harpoon or Command: Modern Air Naval Operations] This game is about battlefield decisions. Having played KSP first, I found lining up orbits and intersecting kinda easy (at least in the first few missions), but each mission is decided in a battle at a single intersecption or fly-by. You have either are entering a battle that uses your strengths or not. You dont have have the resources to try another orbit or "attack" again because you wont have the delta-v or undamaged systems to even bother trying another pass. - Since each mission is determined by a single encounter, things go bad in battle fast. This is fine, but the battles seem to play in real time only, no pausing and no time scaling. This makes the game hard to control and it is hard to try new things (and it is hard to see what is really going on). More importantly, IT IS HARD TO ENJOY BATTLES. Given the short nature of battles I think the graphics are fine, but the battles happen sooooo fast the player does not get a chance to look around. You cant say to yourself, "I wonder what kind of damage happens if I concentrate all of my railguns on their engine", because as the battle starts if you are just staring at the enemy ship, watching the light show, so many other decsions have to be made. How are my drones doing, how are my missles doing, should I launch more, how much damage am I taking, should I change the angle of my ship, how is my weapon range, is the enemy closing or moving away, how much ammo do I have left. Having two ships to baby sit makes it even harder to watch the damage to the enemy ship. All of this kills the enjoyment factor when the battles only play in real time. Maybe a battle replay would help too. - Above I mentioned that "the battles seem to play in real time only" because I am not really sure what all of the keys do. Other reviewers have mentioned this. There doesnt seem to be a list anywhere of the keyboard layout. I even did the old "run your hands across the keyboard randomly" just to figure out some of the keys. This is the year 2016, come on. - There is no quick save, or at least I cant find one (maybe it is hiding with the keyboard layout). Once you start a mission look at the orbits, make some burns, line up a perfect interscept, start battle, BAM ! Forgot to turn my ship to broadsides. START THE MISSION OVER FROM THE BEGININNG. Now the player has to rework the orbits and the timings, make the burns, interscept, start battle. Draw, no one won first pass. Neither side has fuel to try another pass. START THE MISSION OVER FROM THE BEGINNING. As the missions get harder, this is more of a pain. This makes it very hard if not impossible to try new things. Trying new things means starting the whole mission over. After a successful, hard mission, you dont feel like starting over just for the sake of trying something new, you just move on to the next mission. - I wish it had a campaign more like KSP's career mode, where money and what you accomplish really matter. You are just dropped into these crafted situations that dont really matter in the long run. There is no "long run", but I knew that going into this game, it is just wishful thinking. The author of this game does such a good job of thinking things through, maybe a grand strategy version of this game would be bleak. The strategy game probably revolve around fuel transports, fuel producion and depots. I think it would quickly end up like the BattleTech universe where the first few wars whipe out so much so fast, all of the warring sides would come together and agree not to attack some targets (jumpship yards in BattleTech)(and they agree not to ues weapons of mass destruction). This post is getting too long, I will come back later and edit after I have played more. Summary - interesting, science based space battle sim, not like KSP, graphics are fine (easily improved in future), needs a quick save, need to be able to change the rate of time in battles, UI could use some polish, needs a sandbox campaign of some sort. Even though I gave it a negative review I think of this game as "early access" with improvements yet to come ... ( and I dont mind supporting games like these) P.S. Edit begins here - After playing a few more hours , I have more thoughts : the more I stare at the orbits screen, the more I shake my head. I am currently on the "Homecoming" mission and it seems like a waste of time to make the player worry about complicated orbits and picking up some general (the mission is to return your ship to Mars, from a far away asteroid). I hate to even mention KSP, but I think KSP makes figuring out orbits so much easier. In comparison, KSP shows you how fast you are going and your orbital altitude, and CoaDE primarily uses your delta-V and an orbital picture. So in KSP you are staring at numbers and in CoaDE you are staring at an orbital picture. In CoaDE you adjust your orbit to the target, the intersect icon appears, you click 'intersect', BAM!, warning not enough delta-V remaining (or there is a warning that the mission's time limit is up). You say to yourself, "Ok, my orbit path is wrong, I can't do that. Hmm what is really wrong with my orbit ?" Because CoaDE doesnt use numbers (or any other hard information about your orbits) you dont know EXACTLY what to do adjust to make a perfect intercept. The only thing you have to work with is the orbital picture showing your path. Long story short, this leads to a lot of trial and error adjustments, pretty much making random adjustments (or series of adjustments). You slowly learn how to make better paths, but the game does not teach you why that path is better. I looked for help on YouTube and found a playthrough of the mission I was having trouble with, and that guy was just making random adjustments, all the while talking to himself sort of saying 'ok I know what I need to do, how do I get the game to do it'. To make matters worse (or "easier") you can base your path on the orbit of your target. This displays your orbital path as a curly q line, which can make it easier to intersect an orbit, but it makes it harder to understand the consequences of your actions (your actions dont matter as long as the curly q line ends up where you want). P.P.S. Edit #2 - I feel my review has a few too many negative points so I wanted to add a few positive moments that have hapened in the game. I have played up to the 13th mission Vesta Overkill, but I have switched over to playing in sandbow mode, creating ships and modules (you can unlock the design aspect early if you find the right menu in the game). Most of my weapons revolve around nuclear bombs. There is something satisfying about designing and detonating a 3.25gt (3250 megaton) nuclear missle in the middle of an enemy fleet. I have also designed a cannon firing 4.4kt nuclear bombs that are about the size of Coke bottle (10cm x 40cm), at about 10 rounds a second. It seems like nuclear bombs will dominate the future too. I have spent most of my design efforts trying to guard against nuclear bombs, by upgrading stock ships so the AI has a chance.
  • NexusLink (RJA)

    Jun 20, 2017

    This game provides the most realistic handling of space combat that I have ever seen, and the ability to customize nearly every spec of the equipment that your ships use adds a whole new level to the game. Also, the large amount of tactical depth in the game, and the many decisions of what choices to make in each design area make this a perfect game for those who love space, customizable designs, or inclusion of real science in games.
  • Jessica.r.Timm

    Jun 27, 2017

    Not sure if I can call it a game, it's a extremely scientific in depth space combat simulator/design program. Apart from very challenging combat scenarios this software will let you design every aspect of your spaceship like reactor, weapons, missile parts, drones, engines- literally every minor part can be design from scratch. Its overwhelming and incredibly accurate with tons of details. If you like Orbiter or Kerbal Space Program and if you are more scientific type you should definitely give this software a look.
  • heisenX

    Jul 3, 2017

    Essentially a detailed simulation of near-future space warfare, disguised as a game
  • blah-blah-blah-etc

    Aug 25, 2017

    I have been waiting for a hard science fiction combat game for a decade, and, suddenly, here it is - and it is excellent! Imagine Kerbel but entirely outside the atmosphere, less cutesy and focused on combat and you have a good idea of what is happening in this game. This is not Star Wars or Eve - combat happens at astronomical ranges, between cyclindrical (because it is the most efficient shape) ships bristling with radiators and armed with realistic weapons. Much of your time will be plotting orbits, deciding when to launch drones and missles, and strategizing about how to deal with incoming attacks as the weapons fly towards you over the course of in-game hours. The attention to detail is astonishing - heating effects, radiation, many forms of realistic armor and even the effective spectra of different laser types are modelled. The single-player campaign is also compelling and tightly writtten (even if some of the orbit-changing missions are more challenging, and less interesting) than the combat missions. The UI is clear and really well done, even when dealing with complicated issues. Even though it isn't flashy, there is still a bit of an arcade-ish thrill to watching a missle swarm close on an enemy carrier, and crossing your fingers that your weapons have enough delta-v to avoid the incoming counter fire. An impressive achievement.
  • Marshall_B

    Oct 11, 2017

    Have you installed BD Armory for Kerbal Space Program and wished you could set up proper space-bound engagements between your warships? Have you ever designed custom missions in Orbiter just so you could smash two space stations together? If so, this game is for you! No other game has ever modeled near-future space combat so faithfullly and realistically. Prepare to spend hours reading up on austenitic vs martensitic steels just so you can design the perfect railgun and finally beat that blasted Corvette at its own long-range ballistic game (or download one on the Workshop, more on that later). But you'll need a better nuclear reactor to run it. Oh, and you probably need a smaller, more efficient reactor to power your railgun. Whoops, need a more appropriately shaped command module for your 15km/s needle launcher ship, lest you give the enemy enough surface area to target. And you'll probably want some shorter radiators to keep them from just spraying at your long-range ships to thermally cripple them (or some longer ones so you can use two and orient nose-ways at them.) Heck, maybe you'll spring for exotic materials across the board so you can take out their entire fleet with your one 500 cubic meter ship (that costs about a million credits)! Bottom line: if "realistic, customizable spaceship chess" sounds like a good time to you, there is no other game like it. Even if it doesn't, the stock ships and the numerous ships and modules now available on the Steam Workshop can give you dozens of hours of fun just simulating space battles with frikkin' lazer beams (they're not really lasers, they're tracers on hypervelocity projectiles, but you can pretend. Also lasers are an option too.) There's no game like it, and if "gravity assisting a missile swarm around an asteroid to soften up an opposing, superior fleet of giant gun-covered aluminum cigars so your giant gun-covered aluminum cigars stand a decent chance of winning in a fly-by fight" sounds at all like a good time, Children of a Dead Earth with be a good time for you. Desiging your own modules, projectiles and ships is a big plus if you're into it, but even if you're not the Workshop is rapidly filling up with highly optimized modules for you to download.
  • KerbonautCC

    Dec 18, 2017

    I'm not sure how to adequately explain just how intricate and addictive this game is. You play through the first few campaign missions, and you start to get a feel for how things work. Missile salvos, intercepts, adjusting your orbit, etc. Keep going, and you unlock ship design. This is essential for beating the infamous mission, Vesta Overkill (protip: bring lots of Stinger Drones, Flak Missiles too if they fit in your mass budget). Once you conquer Vesta, you unlock Module Design (unless you cheat, that is, but why not go for the achievement?). This is where the real meat and potatoes of the game is. I started by playing with Railgun Design. It's basically a puzzle of playing with sliders to get what you want, while hoping that design problems don't crop up. And if they do, you either tweak stuff to get rid of them, or realize that the limitations of real materials just won't let you launch a 1 kilo slug at 20 km/s. What you CAN do is launch a pellet of between 1 to 10 grams at that speed. And then eventually you realize that you can use a capacitor to drastically reduce the amount of power you need for your super death sandblaster, while maintaining or even improving the muzzle velocity. Don't forget to pay attention to your recharge time: too little power input, and it'll take multiple seconds for each shot. You want multiple shots per second, of course. And you also want to keep the spread as low as possible, to increase the effective range. Barrel Armor helps with that. Oh, and don't make the whole thing too heavy, or else you'll need a larger turret to contain the heavy reaction wheels to turn the whole thing at a reasonable speed. And don't forget that those reaction wheels need power too..... And maybe once you go through all that and master your railgun design, you'll move on to rocket engines. It's not just the stock ships or guns that suck, it's the stock EVERYTHING that needs improvement. I managed to make a nuclear rocket engine that is smaller, lighter, more efficient, AND more powerful than the stock one using equivalent fuel. And after upgrading my custom Grain-Silo shaped Chariot of the Gods with those rocket engines, I turned my attention toward the venerable stock Flak Missiles. I designed a small combustion rocket (and the fuel tanks to go with it), added a lead radiation shield as a kinetic payload, and hurled my new creations at the nearest stock Gunship. Let's just say that a chunk of lead travelling at 5 km/s will go straight through almost anything. And while a Flak Missile's explosive payload will explode when shot, obliterating the rest of the missile, the same can't be said for Lead. So even if your enemy disables these missiles, the unguided debris still has a decent chance to hit them. So while you might be daunted by this Simulator's severe case of Programmer Art, or unsure if you can wrap your head around orbital mechanics, rest assured that Children of a Dead Earth will reward every ounce of effort that you put into it. Even after the most frustrating defeats, you always walk away having learned something new. And when you're ready, you can dive into a design system that opens up a whole new world to you. If you are at all interested in Sci-Fi space battles, you should at least consider this game. And if you're into Hard Sci-Fi, I'd be surprised if you don't already own this gem. It's by far one of my favorite Niche titles in my Library.
  • Kanashii

    Jul 21, 2018

    ===[ Audience: ]=== ☐ Kids ☐ Everyone ☐ Casual players ☐ Pro players ☑ Autists who want a realistic space combat sim ===[ Graphics: ]=== ☐ Potato ☐ Really bad ☑ Bad, but playable ☐ OK ☐ Good ☐ Beautiful ☐ Masterpiece It looks like a realistic space combat sim would. Pretty bland. Every graphical decision the gamedev made was purely functional. That said, PD guns make beautiful streams of molten metal. ===[ Price/quality: ]=== ☐ Full price ☐ Wait for sale ☑ Average ☐ Refund it if you can ☐ Don't do it ===[ Requirments: ]=== ☐ 90' PC ☐ Minimum ☑ Medium ☐ Fast ☐ High end ☐ NASA computer ===[ Difficulty: ]=== ☑ Depends on your skill ☐ You just need 2 arms ☐ Ez ☐ Easy to learn / Hard to master ☐ Hard (first few hours) ☐ Dark Souls Have you played KSP? Do you have a vague understand orbital mechanics? Are you patient in designing your own spaceships? If yes, this game shouldn't be too difficult. This probably isn't the game to learn orbital mechanics in though. ===[ Game time/length ]=== ☐ Really short ( 0 - 2 hours) ☐ Short ( 2 - 8 hours) ☐ Few hours ( 8 - 12 hours) ☐ Long ( 12+ hours) ☑ Endless ===[ Story ] === ☐ It doesn't have ☑ There is a story but gameplay isn't focused on it ☐ Still better than Twilight ☐ Average ☐ Good ☐ Fantastic ===[ Bugs ]=== ☐ Game itself is one big BUG ☐ Bugs destroying the game ☐ Lot of bugs ☑ Few Bugs ☐ You can use them for speedrun ☐ Nothing ===[ Pay to Win ]=== ☐ Yes ☑ No
  • vassilevb

    Dec 15, 2018

    This is a great game. Developers got my respect for transparently communicating what exactly has been modeled and what hasn't. This is indeed the most realistic space combat simulation that has ever existed and it will bust almost all of the misconceptions that are constantly reinforced by pop culture (e.g. Star Wars movies and space-faring games (like Rodina, No Man's Sky, Eve Online, Everspace, etc.) that are totally ignoring the facts of realistic movement within the enormous scale of interplanetary (not to mention interstellar) space). My guess is that the dealbraker for some (or rather many) people would be adapting to the user interface and the general appearance of the game — it generally doesn't look and feel as a typical game, but rather as a (semi-)professional simulation software. Also, if one is unfamiliar with basic concepts of orbital mechanics, then Kerbal Space Program would be a better (i.e. more user-friendly) start for him/her. For a typical casual player the entertainment value will come after a lot of hours and patience. In short, the game is worth it and I highly recommend it.
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Children of a Dead Earth

Children of a Dead Earth

89% Positive / 484 Ratings

RELEASE DATE

Sep 23, 2016

DEVELOPER / PUBLISHER

Q Switched Productions, LLC / Q Switched Productions, LLC

TAGS

    SimulationStrategy
The Most Scientifically Accurate Space Warfare Simulator Ever Made.

Children of a Dead Earth is a simulation of true-to-life space warfare. Design your spacecrafts using real world technologies. Traverse the solar system using actual orbit mechanics. Command fleets as the solar system descends into war, and see if you have what it takes to become the victor.

Features

REAL SCIENCE, REAL TECHNOLOGY - Every technology, from the Nuclear Thermal Rockets, to the Railguns, to the Magnetoplasmadynamic Thrusters, was implemented using actual equations from Engineering and Physics textbooks and white papers. Every aspect of these systems, efficiency, size, mass, power usage, heat dissipation, are all derived from valid equations.

CAMPAIGN AND SANDBOX MODES - Assume the role of an admiral and fight through a detailed storyline chronicling the descent of the solar system into all out war, spanning every planet in the solar system and everything in between. Or simply play in the sandbox, designing ships and pitting them against other ships.

EXTREMELY ACCURATE ORBITAL MECHANICS - With an N-Body Simulator (the kind NASA uses to plot spacecraft trajectories), all orbital phenomenon from hyperbolic orbits, Lagrange points, and orbital perturbation are all correctly simulated. Spacecrafts can stationkeep orbits, or enter into free falling perturbed orbits.

1:1 SCALE - The solar system is modeled completely to scale. The sizes of all planets, moons, and asteroids are accurately enormous, and the distance between them is similarly huge. The extremely high orbital speed of your ships deep in high gravity orbits is correspondingly correct.

FREEFORM SHIP DESIGN - Build your spacecrafts out of rockets, propellant tanks, weapons, powerplants, radiators, and crew modules. Wrap it all up with multiple armor layers, and maybe a Whipple Shield to boot. The acceleration, moment of inertia, delta-v, and much more are all correctly calculated for all spacecrafts you design.

HIGHLY GRANULAR MODULE DESIGN - Tweak everything from the nozzle length or stoichiometric mixture ratio of your bipropellant rockets to the armature and rail dimensions of your railguns. The results of every change is seen in real time, from the change in your rocket's exhaust velocity, to your railgun's inductance or muzzle velocity.

PHYSICALLY ACCURATE MATERIAL PROPERTIES - All materials, chemical reactions, and spectra are physically correct. When your arclamp pumps your solid state laser, the pumping bands need to match up with the actual emission spectra of your excitation gas. When the photon absorption of a material is needed, it is derived from actual refractive index spectra data.

IN-ENGINE MOD SUPPORT - The engine supports black box creation of untested or far future technology for modders to work with. All other game data, from levels to material properties, is also accessible to modders.

STEAM WORKSHOP SUPPORT - Subscribe to mods on Steam Workshop, and they will automatically load. In-game export tools allow instant uploading of your own designs to Steam Workshop.

All of the above aspects combine to yield a space warfare simulator that is unparalleled in scientific realism. No other game combines the extremely accurate orbital mechanics, 1:1 scale of the solar system, and technology which is implemented 100% by scientific equations. If you ever wanted to know what space warfare would

actually

be like, this is the game for you.

Children of a Dead Earth pc price

Children of a Dead Earth

Children of a Dead Earth pc price

89% Positive / 484 Ratings

Sep 23, 2016 / Q Switched Productions, LLC / Q Switched Productions, LLC

    SimulationStrategy
Price Comparison
  • United States
    $19.99 $19.99
  • Argentina
    ARS$224.99 ≈$1.08
  • Turkey
    ₺31.99 ≈$1.67
$19.99 / Get it

Reviews

  • CaptainKoloth

    Dec 24, 2021

    Amazing idea. Not well executed. I am an astrophysicist, aerospace engineer, and a gamer. I want to love this game. I tried hard to love this game. I am squarely the target audience for this game, and I am willing to give it a tremendous amount of leeway. However, while there may be a tremendous amount of extremely accurate stuff going on under the hood, that's precisely the problem- it's under the hood. As the player, you can't see any of it. Sid Meier, the famous video game developer of Civilization, PIrates, Railroad Tycoon, et al. fame, has a number of axioms for good video game design. One of these is that you need to be cautious that the player is the one having the fun rather than the designer. This is a perfect example of a game that fails that rule. If you read the store description, you'll see that, for example, the game has an extremely accurate orbit propagator. I am certain this is true. But where do I see that in the game? There is no visibility into how orbits are being calculated, what forces are being taken into effect, or into what the orbital trajectories would look like with a less accurate propagator. The orbits might as well be completely abstracted and not physically calculated at all. I'm not sure a typical player would be able to tell. The designer had a lot of fun coding a highly accurate propagator, but the results are invisible and ultimately irrelevant to the player. Even more important is what this does to the combat phase. On the game's website it will talk about how each projectile is being physically simulated with real equations, the force generated by magnetic coils, the torque it imparts to the firing spacecraft, etc. Again, I'm sure this is true. I'm very excited by this as a theory. But there is no layer connecting the physics to the gameplay. As a player, all you see is a confusing mass of colors, some slowdown, and then some messages about what got damaged. You have no idea what weapons damaged what, how, where, when, or why. You have very little capability to do anything to really affect the combat, and again, while I'm sure all the physics of the engagement are highly accurate, they are totally invisible to the player. The designer clearly had an enormous amount of fun coding an extraordinarily accurate physical simulation of space warfare. I'm sure it IS accurate. But he forgot to include an intermediate layer actually connecting the player to any of the calculations occurring or allowing him to meaningfully affect it, or even see it. The sad thing, this would be very easy to fix since all the hard work of calculating the physics is already done. One could envision some kind of log showing what weapons were fired, what calculations were made regarding, e.g. their velocity based on the power input to the weapons involved, what happened when the projectiles hit the other ship, etc. Many combat sims that strive for realism have such logs (e.g. in a tank game showing what projectiles hit where and what they did). However, since the game has unfortunately long since been abandoned, this will never happen. I wish this weren't the case. I so want to love this game... but it's a good set of equations running somewhere, not a good game. And I'd even be OK with that at some level, but I don't even know what the equations are. The fact that somewhere an accurate physics simulation is happening that I am completely unable to see is not of a lot of value to me as a player or a consumer.
  • dennisvlahos

    Feb 16, 2022

    This has been an amazing journey and I highly recommend!

    If you ever wanted to roleplay as James Holden from The Expanse, doing gravity slingshots across the solar system and making high velocity intercepts, this is definitely the game for you. It is a bit complex but the campaign (that acts as a tutorial) does a good job of gradually explaining everything and the interface is structured and concise. The game comes with a small library of articles and links to Wikipedia that will take you from being scientifically illiterate to designing nuclear reactors in no time, so don't let the complexity intimidate you. You will be learning so much about orbits, materials and chemical reactions from this, it's not even funny. Story mode is cheesy but fun and you can make your own campaigns and levels. However you will be spending most of your time designing custom ships & modules and pitting them against each other in the sandbox mode. The AI in general is a bit stupid but you can easily mod in custom behavior templates to fit your designs. Speaking of mods, there is workshop integration so you can share designs with other people and download custom stuff like material/AI mods. Much of the game is moddable, and allows you to create out of the box cheat "black box" modules intended to allow you to simulate far future or fictional technology (like The Expanse's reactionless drive). As far as simulation goes, this is currently the most precise depiction of what interplanetary warfare

    might

    look like. The most important aspect (orbital mechanics) is very accurately simulated - you will be blown away by how counter intuitively (but at the same time intuitively) orbits work - and

    most

    of the assumptions made about everything else are sound. When you are designing e.g. a combustion rocket in the module designer, you can be reasonably certain that what you're creating can be made in the real world, and that it would perform very similarly. Less so when you're making stuff like nukes (much of the information is confidential) or railguns (your rails don't need replacement after thousands of multi-megawatt shots, an unsolved material-science problem today), the more experimental a technology the lower being the realism of course. Now this being a hard sci-fi game you might expect to be disappointed by the limitations that reality and the rocket equation impose on your designs, but this actually makes it even more fun - if not more challenging, and you will be constantly surprised by just how much "sci fi" is really possible. Physical limitations create some very exciting problems that you have to weave around, which are curiously absent from most sci-fi (e.g. managing your tight propellant budget). There are so many design decisions to be made about your modules and where to place them, your choice of fuel and propellant, what kind of damage to armor against and in which way (armor composition is very in depth and you can make whipple shields, spall liners, composite or monolithic plates), if it would be better to forgo armor and rely on more propellant for evading intercepts, whether to specialize or to have a multipurpose ship, whether to go big and redundant or small and agile, whether to have fewer expensive ships versus more cheap ships and so much more. There are just as many decisions to be made when you're charting a course to intercept an enemy fleet, or trying to out-maneuver a ship or an incoming drone/missile salvo intercept. Since there is no stealth in space, you can see the composition and fitting of your enemy from ten orbits away and plan accordingly. The angle and speed at which you intercept a target literally dictate how combat evolves. If you intercept retrograde or perpendicular to your target the resulting combat will be over in seconds because of the speeds involved, but all bullets and kinetic kill missiles will have that much more power, making armor weaker. You may intercept prograde and purposely at very low speeds to pummel the enemy fleet with your long range lasers and coilguns, keeping out of range of their short range cannons. When combat begins, you again need to make so many decisions ! Where to move to evade heavy fire, how to roll to expose less damaged parts of the armor to incoming fire (perhaps ensuring that your armor is properly angled for maximum ricocheting), which weapon systems to offline when one of your reactors get hit and now suddenly you are at half power output, etc. However, if you want your designs to be super realistic you need to consider certain things outside of the game, because the game will let you do things that make no sense in reality. For example, the radiation that a nuclear reactor emits is calculated and your crew needs to be shielded against it, but you can armor your ship with depleted uranium and cover your crew compartment with hangars for nuclear reactor powered drones and the game will never complain. Likewise fuel lines, ammunition conveyors, sensors, heatpipes and other stuff are all abstracted away. All of the ships' modules however are simulated correctly in real time - they draw power, output heat to radiators, reload etc. If you lose some of your reactor's radiators, the reactor is forced to wind down and suddenly you don't have enough power to feed all of your lasers at once. Material cost is calculated by the solar abundance of the elements that make up your modules but manufacturing complexity is not considered. Coming up with a realistic design that works is really satisfying ! The music is good. The sound design is great - there is no sound in space, but you will be enjoying the terrifying and visceral noises of your armor being pummeled by hypervelocity slugs and your crew compartment violently depressurizing. The graphics are very simple and rather bland. Very much programmer art, although it doesn't detract from the experience. You can spice things up by using 3rd party effect injectors like ReShade. The performance is bad. The game is not optimized much and you will be having problems - the n-body simulator is CPU bound - even with a good computer. If you have too many missiles, drones and guns in the same combat the simulation will slow to a crawl. If you are charting e.g a complex multiple-burn maneuver targeting multiple fleets your display will crawl and you

    will

    unavoidably get frustrated trying to input precise movements through a slideshow. Cluttered battlespaces with multiple fleets, missiles and drones in orbit will make it difficult, frustrating and hard to the eyes to plot courses. There are a few bugs, through not too many to seriously impact your play. You won't experience crashes under normal circumstances, but things get dicey if you try to introduce extreme amounts of complex designs. If you have a reasonably powerful computer, an interest in hard sci-fi and some patience, this is truly a one-of-a-kind experience. Yes, it is a niche unoptimized indie game by basically a lone developer, that will frustrate you and drive you up a wall plenty of times, but I am so glad that it exists. Buy it and try it out within the 2 hour refund window. The ship and module designer start out locked but you can unlock them through the "Infolinks" menu. You will probably be able to tell if this game is for you immediately - you'll either be indifferent to it or you'll love-hate the crap out of it.

  • Shinelite

    Sep 20, 2022

    This is an abysmal game and a terrible testing environment. There is no save feature mid-mission. You can't save and quit and come back later. And if you crash you lose all progress. That happened to me multiple times. That's unacceptable, so this'll always be a negative review so long as that is missing. Second, the dev has abandoned the project. Third, you might want to forget about missions and just test weapons and armor. Well, the game is not set up to let you do that. Things happen at an extremely fast rate, and you cannot slow down time to watch how exactly they happen. You have terrible camera controls, so it's hard to view things from the angle you want. There is significant frame slowdown when you turn on the armor viewer to see what armor is getting hit where. There's no log of events to review what transpired and see how effective any given component was. There are also hidden engine limitations that people mistake for physics. For example, the rate of fire of guns is limited to a specific value - no faster than 1 shot per 33 m/s. But the game doesn't tell you about that. So a gun that fires 1 shot per 34ms is identical to one that fire one shot per 65ms. There's no warning indicator or heads up that this is happening. Another example, for months people believed you could create Nuclear Explosively Formed Penetrators, just like a HEAT round but using a nuke for the explosive. But actually this was due to a camera bug. Yes, a CAMERA bug! You can accidentally teleport your nukes inside of the enemy ship by clicking on them after you fire. The game also fails to account for propulsion that isn't located at the back of the ship. It doesn't know how to maneuver a craft that has only sideways thrusters, e.g. a gun-fired projectile with limited guidance. Oh, and the way this game does missile guidance is the worst setup you could possibly imagine. The worst. No, it's even worse than you're thinking. It's atrocious. Don't bother giving up $20 for an abandoned project with zero quality of life features.
  • Wardog362

    Sep 25, 2022

    Q switched productions can you please release Children of a dead earth as open source software. Many people love this game and want to mod it to the full extent possible. dont let this unique game die please.
  • Faffy

    Oct 7, 2022

    Got to the mission "Retaking Ceres" It's a giant middle finger to the player and not one i've beaten without knowledge of game bugs and exploiting the AI.
  • Doctor Game

    Feb 25, 2023

    It's Kerbal Space Program, if the Kerbals fled a dying Kerbin and had interfactional space-war and realistically modelled space-death.
  • The Inventor

    Sep 24, 2016

    EDIT 2: (July 7, 2018) HEY, THIS GAME HAS A LEVEL EDITOR NOW!! YEAH!!! EDIT: It's been a while, so find my longer-term review down below this! -=ORIGINAL REVIEW=- So after logging about an hour of the game, this is what I gotta say so far... PROS: - Holy shit; it's about time that the gaming market has gotten a game like this. Hard sci-fi fans have been denied a game that they can seriously dig their number-crunching teeth into for YEARS. - Controlling your ships is very easy and convenient. - Combat is really fun to watch, and really does highlight all the reasons why practical and realistic space combat is really cool. - I love the worldbuilding and story that is in this game. I really appreciate that the game also comes with an area where I can simply read over who the different factions are, and what the system's history entails. - SANDBOX MODE, YEAAAAHHHH!!! SUCK IT, MWO! THIS GAME ACTUALLY HAS A SANDBOX MODE. - The soundtrack~ Aw yis, this is a very good soundtrack. Not too in-your-face to be distracting, but also active enough to not be boring. The various synths are constructed really well, and are generally very satisfying to listen to. The drums are a very interesting choice, given the theme of the game, but any alternative I would have picked would have been way too aggressive or electronic, and thus distract the player. - The sound design is really excellent as well. Similar to the soundtrack, it sits between two extremes very nicely, giving that extra bit of feedback without being annoying. (Here, I'm looking at a few games in particular where the sound of your mouse going over a menu button is some super-obnoxious beep that never seems to stop haunting you. This game doesn't have that; it won't haunt you in your sleep.) - SpeakING OF SOUND DESIGN: NO SOUND IS SPACE, CAN I GET A HELL YES?? - Can I also mention that the actual GAMEPLAY is really unique as well? It kinda works as an real-time and turn-based hybrid, giving you time to think when you need it, but still remaining within a constantly-moving universe. - Orbital mechanics: yes. Just yes. No botchy estimations. We actually get full physical simulations of orbits, with all the fun traits it brings. We even get to choose our frame of reference, which is really nice. - I have yet to find a bug in the game. - Tutorial is included and very clear, thank the galaxy. CONS: - I'm really used to the mouse rotating in another direction when I drag it a certain way. It would be really nice to have an option where we can invert certain dragging directions. - I feel like this is a game that a lot of Hollywood fans are gonna attack because they don't understand what it's actually trying to accomplish here. I'm trying to spread news of this game as far and wide as I can to all the hard sci-fi nerds I know, because this game deserves to have an awesome fanbase. I may post another review as I get more hours into this, because I invariably will. -=UPDATE REVIEW=- Hi! Me again! Now that I've logged a few more hours into this, and have been around long enough to see a few released updates, I will add the following: I had the following con of "I'm really used to the mouse rotating in another direction when I drag it a certain way. It would be really nice to have an option where we can invert certain dragging directions." Well, the developer did see this really early, and added an option for this! Now I have no real personal cons against this game! Also: UPDATES! Yes, this game is still being actively updated to squash bugs, improve gameplay, and make optimizations! I've also gotten to the ship customization point of the campaign, as well as module customization, and WOAH. Boys, Girls, and Non-Binaries, if you enjoy tinkering the ever-loving shit out of your creations, DOWN TO THE LENSE OF A LASER, then this is definitely the game for you! Still amazing! Would still recommend! 11/10!
  • AlienPickle

    Sep 24, 2016

    This game is everything I've been wanting in "realistic" space combat. Imagine Kerbal but with non-fantasy weapons, and a pretty decent campaign of scenarios. This game is NOT easy. You'll have to get your head around real-world physics, because there is no flying by the seat of your pants. Everything is a plotted intercept course, and the extremely limited amount of fuel the ships can carry means it's as much a puzzle game as anything. It's all about timing and altering your orbit to put your ship in position to fire at the enemy. Intersecting ellipses and last moment course correction burns. Some ships are carriers for drones, so you use the carrier to line up the intercept and then let the drones burn their own fuel while you stay out of gun range yourself. This is all very plausible. The closest I've ever seen this elsewhere is Ken Burnside's "Attack Vector Tactical" board game. This is NOT Star Trek. I sincerely hope the developers continue to expand on this game, keep making scenarios, and maybe figuring out how to get some multiplayer into the next iteration. I'm going to be busy a long while with this.
  • r4m0n

    Sep 25, 2016

    THIS GAME ISN'T FOR EVERYBODY, and it really could have used a few weeks on Early Access to round off the edges. First and foremost: I'm mostly liking the game so far, and I'll probably change this to a recommendation in the future, but as of the writing of this, the game has only 15 positive reviews and no negative ones, so I'll put an warning here before people think this is something it's not and we get a flood of bad reviews. Some general points: Graphics - Rendering realistic space battles isn't an excuse to not at least try to make it pretty. Sorry, but this game really needs a bit love from a 3D artist. I see your normal maps stored in JPG, and if any 3D artist see this they'll try to hang you. This game screams programmer graphics everywhere, and while I'm a programmer myself, this isn't excusable on a $25 title. Interface - Generally quite well done and useable, but could use some more work on the finer points of orbital maneuvers, like being able to move the execution point of the maneuver to change the timing, and splitting fleets of drones/missiles after launch. Sound - Pretty good sound effects and music in general, bit repetitive theme on the menu, but it works overall. Setting - The story and science of the game is the reason you should be getting it, it's pretty well done and a lot of research went into making this game, and it shows. So far I've played up to the 5th campaign mission, and enjoyed the first 4 quite a bit... On the 5th though, you are introduced to missiles, and they just aren't ready for release yet. The main problem is that the terminal guidance (and really, the guidance in general) can't get the job done and even if the target has had its rocket disabled, the missiles can't get a solid hit on the target ship, and much less anywhere near any priority target you set, which makes you being able to finish the mission totally random. Overall, if you like Rocketry, has a general sense of how orbital mechanics works and like realistic simulations, this game is for you, but you might want to wait a bit and see if the rough edges are polished down first. If you can't get a rocket built and on orbit in KSP, you're probably better off passing this one.
  • Ces

    Sep 27, 2016

    >Unlock ability to design custom modules. >Open up nuclear reactor, realize I actually have to understand how to buld a nuclear reactor. >Huh. >Poke around in railguns and coil guns instead. >Decide coilgun is just a poor man's railgun. >Click sliders until I notice I'm getting 60 km/s on my coilgun. >Whut. >Adjust more, begin smiling as speed climbs past 170 km/s. >Adjust more, swap materials, discover I can squeeze 16 Mm/s out of my coilguns. (Using aluminum coils of all things.) >Stick coilgun of doom on tiny ship, name it the cheesepuff. >Proceed to destroy ships 5 times my cost and mass from a completely different orbit. 10/10 would learn physics/materials science again.
  • Cane McKeyton

    Sep 27, 2016

    For lovers of hard science fiction this is pretty much the dream game. Heat radiators, nuclear thermal rockets, lasers, real n-body physics, and orbital mechanics, it’s all here. Star Wars style space battles, you won’t find that here. This is all about matching orbits, flinging missiles at targets hundreds of kilometers away and drilling away at your target’s armor with concentrated laser and rail gun fire. The campaign is challenging enough but the ship and component editor is a whole ‘nother story. Making your own ship components is, to put it lightly, INSANE! The amount of parameters you can modify is mind boggling. Just trying to make a custom laser weapon I have to chose a lasing medium, what material to make the mirrors out of, what are those mirror’s dimensions, what will the freaking coolant pumps be made out of and what fluid will they be pumping and how fast! I feel like I need several advanced engineering degrees to wrap my head around all this, which is cool, but overwhelming! I like that it gives you these insane custom tinkering options but unless you know what you’re doing it’s best to just stick with the stock parts to build your ships. I really can’t think of any other game out there that takes hard science fiction this seriously. Probably Kerbal Space Program is the closest thing to this but that’s really not a helpful comparison.
  • rlg007

    Sep 29, 2016

    I like the fact that someone is trying to make a game that is science based and not just eye candy. I wouldnt call the game "early access", it is 100% playable and I found zero bugs in the few hours I have played, BUT the game is still a little rough around the edges. Here are a few thoughts (based on only a few hours play and only on the first few missions) : - Nothing like KSP. You can build your own ships and adjust orbits, but that is where the similarities end. I do not want anyone to read this review thinking that this is KSP with nukes and lasers. [EDIT: This is more like the old game Harpoon or Command: Modern Air Naval Operations] This game is about battlefield decisions. Having played KSP first, I found lining up orbits and intersecting kinda easy (at least in the first few missions), but each mission is decided in a battle at a single intersecption or fly-by. You have either are entering a battle that uses your strengths or not. You dont have have the resources to try another orbit or "attack" again because you wont have the delta-v or undamaged systems to even bother trying another pass. - Since each mission is determined by a single encounter, things go bad in battle fast. This is fine, but the battles seem to play in real time only, no pausing and no time scaling. This makes the game hard to control and it is hard to try new things (and it is hard to see what is really going on). More importantly, IT IS HARD TO ENJOY BATTLES. Given the short nature of battles I think the graphics are fine, but the battles happen sooooo fast the player does not get a chance to look around. You cant say to yourself, "I wonder what kind of damage happens if I concentrate all of my railguns on their engine", because as the battle starts if you are just staring at the enemy ship, watching the light show, so many other decsions have to be made. How are my drones doing, how are my missles doing, should I launch more, how much damage am I taking, should I change the angle of my ship, how is my weapon range, is the enemy closing or moving away, how much ammo do I have left. Having two ships to baby sit makes it even harder to watch the damage to the enemy ship. All of this kills the enjoyment factor when the battles only play in real time. Maybe a battle replay would help too. - Above I mentioned that "the battles seem to play in real time only" because I am not really sure what all of the keys do. Other reviewers have mentioned this. There doesnt seem to be a list anywhere of the keyboard layout. I even did the old "run your hands across the keyboard randomly" just to figure out some of the keys. This is the year 2016, come on. - There is no quick save, or at least I cant find one (maybe it is hiding with the keyboard layout). Once you start a mission look at the orbits, make some burns, line up a perfect interscept, start battle, BAM ! Forgot to turn my ship to broadsides. START THE MISSION OVER FROM THE BEGININNG. Now the player has to rework the orbits and the timings, make the burns, interscept, start battle. Draw, no one won first pass. Neither side has fuel to try another pass. START THE MISSION OVER FROM THE BEGINNING. As the missions get harder, this is more of a pain. This makes it very hard if not impossible to try new things. Trying new things means starting the whole mission over. After a successful, hard mission, you dont feel like starting over just for the sake of trying something new, you just move on to the next mission. - I wish it had a campaign more like KSP's career mode, where money and what you accomplish really matter. You are just dropped into these crafted situations that dont really matter in the long run. There is no "long run", but I knew that going into this game, it is just wishful thinking. The author of this game does such a good job of thinking things through, maybe a grand strategy version of this game would be bleak. The strategy game probably revolve around fuel transports, fuel producion and depots. I think it would quickly end up like the BattleTech universe where the first few wars whipe out so much so fast, all of the warring sides would come together and agree not to attack some targets (jumpship yards in BattleTech)(and they agree not to ues weapons of mass destruction). This post is getting too long, I will come back later and edit after I have played more. Summary - interesting, science based space battle sim, not like KSP, graphics are fine (easily improved in future), needs a quick save, need to be able to change the rate of time in battles, UI could use some polish, needs a sandbox campaign of some sort. Even though I gave it a negative review I think of this game as "early access" with improvements yet to come ... ( and I dont mind supporting games like these) P.S. Edit begins here - After playing a few more hours , I have more thoughts : the more I stare at the orbits screen, the more I shake my head. I am currently on the "Homecoming" mission and it seems like a waste of time to make the player worry about complicated orbits and picking up some general (the mission is to return your ship to Mars, from a far away asteroid). I hate to even mention KSP, but I think KSP makes figuring out orbits so much easier. In comparison, KSP shows you how fast you are going and your orbital altitude, and CoaDE primarily uses your delta-V and an orbital picture. So in KSP you are staring at numbers and in CoaDE you are staring at an orbital picture. In CoaDE you adjust your orbit to the target, the intersect icon appears, you click 'intersect', BAM!, warning not enough delta-V remaining (or there is a warning that the mission's time limit is up). You say to yourself, "Ok, my orbit path is wrong, I can't do that. Hmm what is really wrong with my orbit ?" Because CoaDE doesnt use numbers (or any other hard information about your orbits) you dont know EXACTLY what to do adjust to make a perfect intercept. The only thing you have to work with is the orbital picture showing your path. Long story short, this leads to a lot of trial and error adjustments, pretty much making random adjustments (or series of adjustments). You slowly learn how to make better paths, but the game does not teach you why that path is better. I looked for help on YouTube and found a playthrough of the mission I was having trouble with, and that guy was just making random adjustments, all the while talking to himself sort of saying 'ok I know what I need to do, how do I get the game to do it'. To make matters worse (or "easier") you can base your path on the orbit of your target. This displays your orbital path as a curly q line, which can make it easier to intersect an orbit, but it makes it harder to understand the consequences of your actions (your actions dont matter as long as the curly q line ends up where you want). P.P.S. Edit #2 - I feel my review has a few too many negative points so I wanted to add a few positive moments that have hapened in the game. I have played up to the 13th mission Vesta Overkill, but I have switched over to playing in sandbow mode, creating ships and modules (you can unlock the design aspect early if you find the right menu in the game). Most of my weapons revolve around nuclear bombs. There is something satisfying about designing and detonating a 3.25gt (3250 megaton) nuclear missle in the middle of an enemy fleet. I have also designed a cannon firing 4.4kt nuclear bombs that are about the size of Coke bottle (10cm x 40cm), at about 10 rounds a second. It seems like nuclear bombs will dominate the future too. I have spent most of my design efforts trying to guard against nuclear bombs, by upgrading stock ships so the AI has a chance.
  • NexusLink (RJA)

    Jun 20, 2017

    This game provides the most realistic handling of space combat that I have ever seen, and the ability to customize nearly every spec of the equipment that your ships use adds a whole new level to the game. Also, the large amount of tactical depth in the game, and the many decisions of what choices to make in each design area make this a perfect game for those who love space, customizable designs, or inclusion of real science in games.
  • Jessica.r.Timm

    Jun 27, 2017

    Not sure if I can call it a game, it's a extremely scientific in depth space combat simulator/design program. Apart from very challenging combat scenarios this software will let you design every aspect of your spaceship like reactor, weapons, missile parts, drones, engines- literally every minor part can be design from scratch. Its overwhelming and incredibly accurate with tons of details. If you like Orbiter or Kerbal Space Program and if you are more scientific type you should definitely give this software a look.
  • heisenX

    Jul 3, 2017

    Essentially a detailed simulation of near-future space warfare, disguised as a game
  • blah-blah-blah-etc

    Aug 25, 2017

    I have been waiting for a hard science fiction combat game for a decade, and, suddenly, here it is - and it is excellent! Imagine Kerbel but entirely outside the atmosphere, less cutesy and focused on combat and you have a good idea of what is happening in this game. This is not Star Wars or Eve - combat happens at astronomical ranges, between cyclindrical (because it is the most efficient shape) ships bristling with radiators and armed with realistic weapons. Much of your time will be plotting orbits, deciding when to launch drones and missles, and strategizing about how to deal with incoming attacks as the weapons fly towards you over the course of in-game hours. The attention to detail is astonishing - heating effects, radiation, many forms of realistic armor and even the effective spectra of different laser types are modelled. The single-player campaign is also compelling and tightly writtten (even if some of the orbit-changing missions are more challenging, and less interesting) than the combat missions. The UI is clear and really well done, even when dealing with complicated issues. Even though it isn't flashy, there is still a bit of an arcade-ish thrill to watching a missle swarm close on an enemy carrier, and crossing your fingers that your weapons have enough delta-v to avoid the incoming counter fire. An impressive achievement.
  • Marshall_B

    Oct 11, 2017

    Have you installed BD Armory for Kerbal Space Program and wished you could set up proper space-bound engagements between your warships? Have you ever designed custom missions in Orbiter just so you could smash two space stations together? If so, this game is for you! No other game has ever modeled near-future space combat so faithfullly and realistically. Prepare to spend hours reading up on austenitic vs martensitic steels just so you can design the perfect railgun and finally beat that blasted Corvette at its own long-range ballistic game (or download one on the Workshop, more on that later). But you'll need a better nuclear reactor to run it. Oh, and you probably need a smaller, more efficient reactor to power your railgun. Whoops, need a more appropriately shaped command module for your 15km/s needle launcher ship, lest you give the enemy enough surface area to target. And you'll probably want some shorter radiators to keep them from just spraying at your long-range ships to thermally cripple them (or some longer ones so you can use two and orient nose-ways at them.) Heck, maybe you'll spring for exotic materials across the board so you can take out their entire fleet with your one 500 cubic meter ship (that costs about a million credits)! Bottom line: if "realistic, customizable spaceship chess" sounds like a good time to you, there is no other game like it. Even if it doesn't, the stock ships and the numerous ships and modules now available on the Steam Workshop can give you dozens of hours of fun just simulating space battles with frikkin' lazer beams (they're not really lasers, they're tracers on hypervelocity projectiles, but you can pretend. Also lasers are an option too.) There's no game like it, and if "gravity assisting a missile swarm around an asteroid to soften up an opposing, superior fleet of giant gun-covered aluminum cigars so your giant gun-covered aluminum cigars stand a decent chance of winning in a fly-by fight" sounds at all like a good time, Children of a Dead Earth with be a good time for you. Desiging your own modules, projectiles and ships is a big plus if you're into it, but even if you're not the Workshop is rapidly filling up with highly optimized modules for you to download.
  • KerbonautCC

    Dec 18, 2017

    I'm not sure how to adequately explain just how intricate and addictive this game is. You play through the first few campaign missions, and you start to get a feel for how things work. Missile salvos, intercepts, adjusting your orbit, etc. Keep going, and you unlock ship design. This is essential for beating the infamous mission, Vesta Overkill (protip: bring lots of Stinger Drones, Flak Missiles too if they fit in your mass budget). Once you conquer Vesta, you unlock Module Design (unless you cheat, that is, but why not go for the achievement?). This is where the real meat and potatoes of the game is. I started by playing with Railgun Design. It's basically a puzzle of playing with sliders to get what you want, while hoping that design problems don't crop up. And if they do, you either tweak stuff to get rid of them, or realize that the limitations of real materials just won't let you launch a 1 kilo slug at 20 km/s. What you CAN do is launch a pellet of between 1 to 10 grams at that speed. And then eventually you realize that you can use a capacitor to drastically reduce the amount of power you need for your super death sandblaster, while maintaining or even improving the muzzle velocity. Don't forget to pay attention to your recharge time: too little power input, and it'll take multiple seconds for each shot. You want multiple shots per second, of course. And you also want to keep the spread as low as possible, to increase the effective range. Barrel Armor helps with that. Oh, and don't make the whole thing too heavy, or else you'll need a larger turret to contain the heavy reaction wheels to turn the whole thing at a reasonable speed. And don't forget that those reaction wheels need power too..... And maybe once you go through all that and master your railgun design, you'll move on to rocket engines. It's not just the stock ships or guns that suck, it's the stock EVERYTHING that needs improvement. I managed to make a nuclear rocket engine that is smaller, lighter, more efficient, AND more powerful than the stock one using equivalent fuel. And after upgrading my custom Grain-Silo shaped Chariot of the Gods with those rocket engines, I turned my attention toward the venerable stock Flak Missiles. I designed a small combustion rocket (and the fuel tanks to go with it), added a lead radiation shield as a kinetic payload, and hurled my new creations at the nearest stock Gunship. Let's just say that a chunk of lead travelling at 5 km/s will go straight through almost anything. And while a Flak Missile's explosive payload will explode when shot, obliterating the rest of the missile, the same can't be said for Lead. So even if your enemy disables these missiles, the unguided debris still has a decent chance to hit them. So while you might be daunted by this Simulator's severe case of Programmer Art, or unsure if you can wrap your head around orbital mechanics, rest assured that Children of a Dead Earth will reward every ounce of effort that you put into it. Even after the most frustrating defeats, you always walk away having learned something new. And when you're ready, you can dive into a design system that opens up a whole new world to you. If you are at all interested in Sci-Fi space battles, you should at least consider this game. And if you're into Hard Sci-Fi, I'd be surprised if you don't already own this gem. It's by far one of my favorite Niche titles in my Library.
  • Kanashii

    Jul 21, 2018

    ===[ Audience: ]=== ☐ Kids ☐ Everyone ☐ Casual players ☐ Pro players ☑ Autists who want a realistic space combat sim ===[ Graphics: ]=== ☐ Potato ☐ Really bad ☑ Bad, but playable ☐ OK ☐ Good ☐ Beautiful ☐ Masterpiece It looks like a realistic space combat sim would. Pretty bland. Every graphical decision the gamedev made was purely functional. That said, PD guns make beautiful streams of molten metal. ===[ Price/quality: ]=== ☐ Full price ☐ Wait for sale ☑ Average ☐ Refund it if you can ☐ Don't do it ===[ Requirments: ]=== ☐ 90' PC ☐ Minimum ☑ Medium ☐ Fast ☐ High end ☐ NASA computer ===[ Difficulty: ]=== ☑ Depends on your skill ☐ You just need 2 arms ☐ Ez ☐ Easy to learn / Hard to master ☐ Hard (first few hours) ☐ Dark Souls Have you played KSP? Do you have a vague understand orbital mechanics? Are you patient in designing your own spaceships? If yes, this game shouldn't be too difficult. This probably isn't the game to learn orbital mechanics in though. ===[ Game time/length ]=== ☐ Really short ( 0 - 2 hours) ☐ Short ( 2 - 8 hours) ☐ Few hours ( 8 - 12 hours) ☐ Long ( 12+ hours) ☑ Endless ===[ Story ] === ☐ It doesn't have ☑ There is a story but gameplay isn't focused on it ☐ Still better than Twilight ☐ Average ☐ Good ☐ Fantastic ===[ Bugs ]=== ☐ Game itself is one big BUG ☐ Bugs destroying the game ☐ Lot of bugs ☑ Few Bugs ☐ You can use them for speedrun ☐ Nothing ===[ Pay to Win ]=== ☐ Yes ☑ No
  • vassilevb

    Dec 15, 2018

    This is a great game. Developers got my respect for transparently communicating what exactly has been modeled and what hasn't. This is indeed the most realistic space combat simulation that has ever existed and it will bust almost all of the misconceptions that are constantly reinforced by pop culture (e.g. Star Wars movies and space-faring games (like Rodina, No Man's Sky, Eve Online, Everspace, etc.) that are totally ignoring the facts of realistic movement within the enormous scale of interplanetary (not to mention interstellar) space). My guess is that the dealbraker for some (or rather many) people would be adapting to the user interface and the general appearance of the game — it generally doesn't look and feel as a typical game, but rather as a (semi-)professional simulation software. Also, if one is unfamiliar with basic concepts of orbital mechanics, then Kerbal Space Program would be a better (i.e. more user-friendly) start for him/her. For a typical casual player the entertainment value will come after a lot of hours and patience. In short, the game is worth it and I highly recommend it.
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